Day 14: 8 basic types of cuts you need to know

Being a chef for your family requires you to make amazingly delicious and classically beautiful types of dishes. So it’s good to know different cutting styles to make pleasantly appealing meals. Many a times recipes call for certain types of cuts. So it’s better to know them well. Once you know them, I’m sure you won’t cut them any other way. Here are 8 basic types of cuts, frequently used in the kitchen.

1. Slice – This is one the most basic cutting technique. In this type of cut, the vegetables or fruits are cut into thin or thick slices, with equal dimensions throughout. This is usually done for things that form a round shape for ex carrots, cucumbers, onions, kiwi etc.

2. Julienne Cut – This is sometimes called the matchstick cut, the reason being that they are cut into long thin matchsticks. Thinly cut strips, they are used in noodles and salads. First the sides of the vegetable are cut to form a square shape. They are then cut into long and wide strips which are then further cut into matchstick sized strips. The approximate width of the strips is about 1/8th inch. Of course, you do not have to measure each time you cut vegetables into juliennes but a rough idea of its size is enough.

3. Brunoise Cut – This is derived from the Juliennes. The previously cut juliennes are stacked together and are further cut into equal sized dice. The measure is approximately 1/16th inch.

4. Small Dice – This is similar to the Brunoise but is of a larger size. It measures approximately 1/8th inch.

5. Medium Dice – Measures about 1/4th inch. Vegetables like potatoes are usually cut in this pattern.

6. Large Dice – A large Dice measure 1/2 an inch throughout.

7. Chiffonade ( Shredding) – This type of cut is used for leafy vegetables. Here the leaves are stacked upon one another. They are then rolled and cut into fine shreds. These are used for garnishes and salads.

8. Mince – These are very tiny chops and usually used for garlic. There is no particular size as they generally turns out to be paste like.

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